Review: Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem (GCN)

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[image title=”edsr” size=”thumbnail” id=”442″ align=”right” linkto=”https://irrationale2.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/edsr.jpg” ]There are dark corners of this earth which remain unexplored, even in our enlightened modern age. In these secluded areas, powerful entities lie in wait. These creatures once roamed the earth, but in ancient times they were trapped into magical prisons from which they can only watch as the human race crawls like a virus over their planet. Only their influence is felt, as events through time are gradually shifted to the point where they will once again have the power to escape their shackles and reign in a new era of darkness over this meager little planet.

This sort of idea has been the work of fantasy for many years, and is especially prevelant in HP Lovecraft’s ‘Cthulhu’ mythos. In 2002, Nintendo released “Eternal Darkness: Sanity’s Requiem”, a survival horror game which explores these dark notions in a novel and compelling way. It is the first ‘mature’ game which Nintendo has released (a welcome change from moustachioed plumbers and sentient pink balls), and is the first Nintendo game to be designated with a ‘Mature’ rating by the ESRB. It is, in this author’s humble opinion, the greatest game which has been produced by Nintendo to date.

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Christmas and the joys of small towns

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Christmas holidays are always a strange time of year. It seems strange that we as modern and educated human beings feel compelled to annually go to the effort of packing a bag, taking time off work and venturing back to our home town to spend time with family members with whom we have little in common.

In my case, I packed my bags and headed back to my home town of Coffs Harbour. A tiny coastal hamlet on the eastern coast of New South Wales in Australia, and a place where I spent the greater part of my childhood and early teens. When I say tiny, I mean tiny in comparison to the capital cities which I now call home, as it is a reasonably sized coastal town – a regional capital, one could say.

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